An Introduction to "Dark Pacific"

We're getting closer to the release of my next record Dark Pacific and I thought I'd tell you a little about where my head was at when I was writing it.

It's always difficult for me to imagine another record beyond the one I'm currently working on, so I won't say Dark Pacific is absolutely the last record for The Workday Release. However, I can say that personally it feels like the record I've been building toward since the beginning of the band.

I've mentioned this before, but I believe I'm a different artist sitting at the piano.

Guitar has always felt somewhat unnatural to me, like I'm an actor that had to learn a few chords to look like I know what I'm doing. And I also talked in a video recently about how singing has always frustrated me, but I love writing lyrics and want to sing them, so I'm learning to embrace the flaws I'm aware of and get better.

Piano is different.

I'm talking less about skill level and more about a feeling.  It was my first instrument and I did take lessons for a number of years but I largely ignored putting in the work I should to make me better (cue the appropriate look on my mother's face).

I'm a very logical, straight-forward, everything can be explained by reason, kind of human.

Sitting at the piano is where I experience mystery, truth, God, pain and redemption.

Heavy, I know.

The simplest of piano parts, just a couple of notes, can sometimes make sense out of life for me in a way little else can.

I think "The Other Side" on City Lights was the first time I ever felt brave enough to release a song written in that very specific place.

This new record was about sitting down and writing a record that felt most like me, free of thinking about writing hits, making money, or pleasing anyone else.

Then, there's the title.

I can only compare what I feel while sitting at the piano to one other non-musical experience and that is when you're standing on the beach at night and everything is quiet aside from the sound of the waves.

In a way, writing this record felt a little like standing on the shore at night feeling afraid to enter the water because it's dark and cold and at some point my head will no longer be above water and I'll have to experience everything below the surface...and then, calmly choosing to do so anyways.

Again, heavy.

This is not to say the record is incredibly sad or super emo or anything like that, I just think that if you know these things, you'll hear the record as it was written.

Can't wait to share more with you.

Until then,

David